>> It's been a LOOOONG time since I've picked up a highlighter (I prefer fluoro pink…) and actively highlighted things on a page… and I definitely have never done so in a magazine.  Then I picked up a copy of Industrie, that aims and claims to be the world's first 'culture of fashion' magazine, which I had previewed a while back… and instantly when I got home, I had to attack it with my highlighter.  I know you guys like a lot of pretty pictures but I'm afraid I don't want to scan in all the images because I do want to emphasise that this is a text-heavy publication that needs to be consumed with at least two mugs of tea and maybe a rainy day (thanks skies!).  TFS have some of the image scoop though…  and there's a very helpful magazine flick-through on video already…

Instead, I've picked out some quotes from the lengthy interview features, mostly conducted by editor Murray Healy as well as some of the tidbits I have picked up from a magazine that gets the scoop on the inside and really delve into the 'process' that people undergo as a stylist, photographer or editor.  It's a READ, not a vanity picture project… and thank god because that highlighter was about to get all dried up…

  • An excerpt from the editor's letter that actually sums up my feelings about the media on the internet… don't shoot me for thinking this…

"Then came the explosive popularity of fashion blogs, Twitter and fashion as entertainment across all media channels.  In the wake of all of that, it is easy to think that things have moved on, that fashion is now a product of a broader consensus; that today, because of sheer volume and accessibility of information, you and I shape the trends.  In fact the change is merely cosmetic.  More people simply report the same things.  True, the broader reach and faster transmission of news has certainly created a business problem in print publishing.  But when it comes to setting the fashion agenda, things have barely moved an inch."

  • From Jens Grede's conversation with Tommy Ton of Jak and Jil

"There are some who say hi and ask me how I am – you can sense they want to be photographed; those aren't the ones I'm really attracted to though.  I'm intrigued by the ones who don't want anything to do with me."

  • Sarah Mower's dream dinner guest…

"It would just be me and Martin Margiela.  So I could thank him for all the clothes I've bought from him, tell him how much he's made me laugh and spend, and hand him a signed petition from all the dispossessed cool women and men I know who want him back!"

  • A page extolling the fact that the Canon Eos 5D MkII can make most inexperienced amateurs into fully fledged pro photographers for less than ¬£2,000 – any thoughts from those that are Nikon die-hards…?

  • At Acne's headquarters in Stockholm, their lucky employees get to have lunches that consist of dishes like courgette soup with beetroot croutons, farinata of fresh garden peas with serrano ham and fennel slaw and some special Acne home made cookies – I'm demanding some of these cookies next time I go to Stockholm…

  • From the meatiest EVER interview with Katie Grand – sorry if I get a bit quote happy with this one…it's just too damn good…

"I think The Face made the wrong decisions. When we started Dazed, we were out every night living that lifestyle – at one point we didn't even go into work because the magazine was being done from my kitchen!   It is hard to do a magazine which is very much about youth culture unless you are living that lifestyle.  By that point, the staff at The Face had just got too old."

"Authority is knowledge.  If someone goes onto the Fashion Spot and writes that a certain magazine is dreadful, that's different from Cathy Horyn saying it is dreadful because there is an authoritative and experienced voice behind the latter point of view.  I don't know what I think about the whole idea of blog culture yet.  The internet is very much like snow blindness; there is so much information available but after a certain point I just can't look at it any more.  There is no real kind of beauty."

"There have been people like Victoria (Young): she was my assistant, she worked on Pop and Love and she's never fucked up, which is very rare.  She was an amazing assistant and she's an amazing fashion director: incredibly conscientious, she looks good, she's fun and she drinks, falls over and lets my rabbit piss on her."

"Fashion may have previously been a working-class profession but over the years it has shifted to become quite middle or upper class.  There are a lot of privileged people working in the industry now and sometimes it's frustrating because it seems there might not be any hunger or need to be somewhere."

  • Panos Yiapanis, whose styling 'atelier' I'm OBSESSED with also gives good word…

"I don't have the knowledge to say, 'Ok let's do something 1950s' or 'something 1960s' – I don't know what the difference is.  So even when I do bring in references, it's always self-centred.  It's always things I've done."

"That idea that stylists have assumed this position where what they wear to Fashion Week is more important than their work is kind of comical.  I hope that changes."

"A show has to excite the press and the buyers but the final product is not meant for them.  They're more the channel through which the clothes end up in the store.  So it's silly just to pander to them and not really think of why you're doing this, which is the consumer."

"Certain publications I don't want to name have used this supposed crisis as a reason to not rock the boat.  But I really think that there is a need for exciting and inspiring work right now.  Because what we're peddling is not a necessity – you can make do without the eighth handbag.  So unless you really excite a person to part with their money – and at this time it's even harder to do that unless you REALLY excite them – then they're just not going to."

Spot this rather hairy wild-eyed rabbit on a random position on Hackney Road…

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…and ye shall find Vintroville, a new addition to the vintage enclave of the East but far enough from the Brick Lane crowds to not have it rammed and overpicked…

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Vintroville is of course at the other end of the scale in comparison to Vintage Academe which I visited earlier in the week.  In fact, there's something distinctly un-fussy and in a way, unpretentious about Vintroville because the owners; the lovely Meryl and Laura, longtime friends who don't come from a fashion background at all, are exactly what they proclaim to be… two gals who like what they like, and are having a bit of fun with their new vintage venture which started out as them accumulating piles of clothes and then selling them on Portobello Road.  They won't have tales of clothing provenance to offer up but they will say "That's cute on you!" and for most seasoned vintage scavengers, you don't need piles of words to go with your piles of clothes anyway. 

It was on Portobello Road, that they had Michael Kors and his team scouring away for 'inspiration' – they picked up a shirt from the girls and soon enough they opened up the shop on Hackney Road.  I wonder whether that shirt lead to an actual Michael Kors design…

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Vintroville mottos itself with the phrase "Vintage without Stinkage" and like a lot of vintage places trying to up their game, pieces come clean and fresh (I took a good whiff of the clothes… I wonder what detergent they use!) and they'll do alterations if you want too… Meryl cropped this shirt to go with the cropped/khaki flow of the summer…

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… not that trends are all that important as the selection are basically things the girls are into and more importantly, they're priced at prices they would pay themselves… so nothing is over ¬£60 and even then, most things are ¬£30 or less… in London terms, this is pretty much bargainous considering the lack of damage and smell too…

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I like the simple "I like what I like and it's going into a shop" attitude… and with affordable vintage, it doesn't necessarily need to be overthought and overwrought… 

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I love the touches of new designers in the racks too like Laura Laura's cute knitwear…

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Oh and men can have a gander too…

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Hopefully there'll be a few summer afternoons down at Mecca Bingo and then popping into Vintroville for some finds…  perhaps I'll end up as happy as this lady here…

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Picture5xf Egg-citing things are on the horizon and this one bit of egg-citing-ness came a bit earlier than expected.  I'm not sure if it's on the news stands yet as normally London newsagents get things first and I've yet to see it, but anyhow, the July "Ageless Style" issue of British Vogue with Cameron Diaz on the cover is out to subscribers for sure… 

The font on the cover is supposed to be orange, not pale pink as well.

Ok, I'm dithering.  I'm not here to discuss pale pink vs. orange fonts or the merits of Cameron Diaz on the cover. 

TA-DA….I'm in the 'Coming of Age' feature, where, you know the score, someone represents each decades (teens, 20s, 30s, 40s, 60s – no 50s, I don't know why…) and blahs about their style and on this occasion I'm the twenties girl.  Which in my head, sounds like I'm someone from the 1920s – I wish it was to do with modes of time travel.  No, no… it's a plain age thing…

Img026 It's quite frightening that there are only a few years before I'm boxed into another decade.  I'm very chuffed though that the twenties in particular is the decade where I've been photographed for such a feature – as it is such a volatile time in general for most people but for me personally, it has also been a style whirlwind that has coincided with the development of this blog.  You can just about read the text (written by Aimee Farrell) in the scan here but the basic gist of it is that I'm feeling a lot happier about my style than when I was at school – then again, I suppose as each decade comes about, that self-assuredness builds up even more.  Ask me again in ten or twenty years time as I'm pretty damn sure, nobody is going to be wanting to ask me to be their 40s, 50s poster girl then…

The portrait was shot by the very charming Jason Bell who I hope will be sending me some of the other shots that were taken around my gaff (including one of me hanging off a stunning hidden spiral staircase I never even knew about… trust Vogue to do some excellent location scouting in about five minutes…).  The shot they used was taken outside the Emirates Stadium (Arsenaaaaaal!) so as I was doing it, there were random tourists looking at me like I was a freak as I stood on this electricity box looking petrified (it's preeeety high up… I wouldn't have been able to do it in heels that weren't wedges!).  The graffiti has been cleaned off now. 

Oh, and BIG BIG BIG props to the EUDON CHOI trench that I'm wearing – this ISN'T a Topshop jacket as stated in mag… not sure how that slipped through but apologies to Eudon – the cut and construction of the trench is perhaps a stretch to be Topshop (soz Toppers… !).  Oh and you can't see but the Christopher Kane skirt has those treacherous double thigh-high slits which in the wind, caused some very loud builder's whistles… so apt for my construction-heavy developing area…

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>> Somebody once again spoke to me about Tall Poppy Syndrome in reference to my blog, that people want to 'cut' you down when you grow too 'tall'.  I don't want to be tall.  I don't even think I AM tall with regards to the blog.  I'm happy being of average height, ta very much.  Is it ok to want to be a wiiilllld poppy instead of a tall one? 

Which weirdly and very oddly brings me to these new Doc Martens which are happily on my feet… they're a 1461 Made in England shoe with a Black WILD POPPY printed leather that is sort of like a deadstock leather now because the factory that makes it has gone bust.  The shoes and matching 1460 boots are also in a limited run of ten (in store now at the Covent Garden and Spitalfields store).  I missed out on the Dr Martens factory visit in Woolaston, something that I was dying to do but these Made in England limited beauties more than makes up for it.  Tommy of This Is Naive took us on a jaunt to a secret garden (ok not so secret…just behind the Odeon on Shaftesbury Avenue…) and I was most pleased indeed there were no tall poppies growing…

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