I’m bringing SexyBack

When I saw this Pringle sweater in Jane magazine being worn backwards like that, it reminded me of girls I keep seeing at gigs who do that – wear their sweaters and cardigans backwards.  I quite like the idea of having the buttons going up backwards and for me, I guess showing off the back is a whole lot more preferable to showing off my non-existent cleavage.  I also like the way the cardigan comes up quite high at the neck at front making people think you’re just wearing a high necked sweater and then surprising people when you turn around.  This could also work with sweaters that have very deep V’s.  On the charcoal cardigan because there were so many gold buttons, I fastened them up to non-matching button holes so that it kind of twisted on itself too.  If it looks a little plain from the front, adding a multi-layered dramatic necklace could work. 

(Background from paulwilloughby.com)

P.S. Excuse the cheesy title of this post – that friggin’ Justin Timberlake song has been on MTV non-stop!

I'm bringing SexyBack

When I saw this Pringle sweater in Jane magazine being worn backwards like that, it reminded me of girls I keep seeing at gigs who do that – wear their sweaters and cardigans backwards.  I quite like the idea of having the buttons going up backwards and for me, I guess showing off the back is a whole lot more preferable to showing off my non-existent cleavage.  I also like the way the cardigan comes up quite high at the neck at front making people think you’re just wearing a high necked sweater and then surprising people when you turn around.  This could also work with sweaters that have very deep V’s.  On the charcoal cardigan because there were so many gold buttons, I fastened them up to non-matching button holes so that it kind of twisted on itself too.  If it looks a little plain from the front, adding a multi-layered dramatic necklace could work. 

(Background from paulwilloughby.com)

P.S. Excuse the cheesy title of this post – that friggin’ Justin Timberlake song has been on MTV non-stop!

Qipao for Me

A while back, I was trying to figure out how a Chinese person could wear a qipao (also known as a cheong sam – traditional Chinese dress) without looking like a waitress or someone in fancy dress.  Then I saw Eurobrat’s post on trying on a Cavalli S/S06-esque qipao dress from Zara which then prompted me to do a further search into the possibility of wearing a qipao that doesn’t look hokey or cheap.  Of course, for people living in countries with the luxury of affordable tailors, the best option would be to choose a tasteful fabric and have a qipao made up for you – a service that I haven’t really taken advantage of even when I’m in Hong Kong.

So then, I came across these sweet dresses from Hong Kong Soho boutique May May King that are available to order internationally.  I vaguely remember passing this store since it’s practically on my doorstep but never had a chance to peek inside, so it’s great that it has a very pro-looking website (so many boutiques in Hong Kong don’t!).  These qi pao’s in less than conventional fabrics, come in a variety of other fabrics too.  From the website, I gather that they’re quite flexible so I think asking them for fabric samples might not be a problem.  I’m really loving the qipaos in black crochet and the 18th century English woodcut fabric too – definitely not getting any ‘hostess/waitress’ vibes from them!     

Can’t leave the house without a hat…

Probably, none of us here will remember the times when going out without a hat meant you were ‘unkempt’ and not at all a proper lady.  Personally, I’m a big hat person and love nothing more than trying on the most ridiculous ones in stores but it’s always very odd to think that what used to be such normal wardrobe attire is now considered a ‘dramatic’ look.  The other day on the 263 bus, I had on the wide brimmed black stain bow hat as shown below, and a 70-something year old lady turned to me and said ‘You look ever so lovely in your hat.  People your age don’t wear hats anymore – why is that?’ and I could only reply ‘I haven’t the foggiest idea…’.

I’m hoping that the hat will return to our wardrobes in the long term.  Caps and wooly beanies are the most common form of hat-age on the streets, then berets (which some people still think of as ‘funny’ looking) and anything beyond that is really a rare occurence.  I love how in the nude issue of Fashion156, for the hair section, their advice is simply ‘Stand out from the crowd in a head turning hat.’  It is the simplest way to adorn your hair and head (and hide bad hair days…).

This is a glimpse at my sizeable hat collection and actually, these are hats that were given or handed down to me, my mother being a venerable source of hats.  Looking at her collection and mine, I do wonder if being a ‘hat person’ is a genetic thing!

Wide Brimmed Black Hat w/ Satin Bow (my mother’s)

1920’s red hair net (gift from my sister)

Straw Hat w/ Dark Green Grograin Ribbon (the hat I had to wear at primary school)